Please Kill Me interviews Nina Antonia

Johnny Thunders photo by Nikki Sudden

Beth Hall for Please Kill Me interviews Nina Antonia about Johnny Thunders and her officially authorized biography. Read it here.

The Prettiest Star eBook

“Glamorous teen heartthrob Brett Smiley had the looks and the talent of a future superstar, but fate had different plans for him. As much the work of a detective as a biographer, The Prettiest Star, Nina Antonia’s expert excavation of the life of Smiley tells one of the most fascinating and tragic ‘what if’ stories of the rock era.” ~ Richard Metzger 

Previously out of print since 2005, The Prettiest Star: Whatever Happened to Brett Smiley? is now available as an eBook on Kindle with an enhanced photo gallery.

Sold Worldwide on Amazon.

$9.99/£8.10

Buy it from Amazon.

The epitome of Fey, ‘Beautiful’ Brett Smiley was primed for fame in the frenetic era of Glam but success was illusory. A former child actor, Brett had everything including a Mephistophelean manager, Andrew Loog Oldham who had steered the Rolling Stones to mega-stardom. Meanwhile, in Liverpool, Nina Antonia, a disenfranchised teenager witnessed Smiley’s sole television appearance in the UK. Interviewed by a concerned Russell Harty, the fate of the young singer was already in jeopardy. With a one way ticket to the boulevard of broken dreams, Brett was to become a missing piece of Nina’s childhood, until their paths crossed, almost 30 years later.

Book Design/Layout: Beth Hall, http://www.bhalldesigns.com

Cover Artwork: colours of the dark, https://www.coloursofthedark.com

The Prettiest Star by Nina Antonia: officially authorised glad-rags & ephemera by colours of the dark:

https://www.coloursofthedark.com/category/the-prettiest-star-by-nina-antonia-authorised-glad-rags-ephemera

‘The Chap’… Dark Angels: Darcy Sullivan interviews Nina Antonia

Prior to lockdown, I was interviewed by the sartorially splendid Darcy Sullivan for the equally dandified spring edition of ‘The Chap.’ Darcy asked some unusually pertinent questions that included a fine quota of Thunder’s related queries and also provided the opportunity to recollect seeing Quentin Crisp in conversation at the Royal Court in Liverpool. Crisp was the first author I’d seen address an audience and he was as you might expect, very witty and engaging. He was also most  gracious when the time came for me to get a copy of ‘The Naked Civil Servant’ signed. Pete Burns was also getting his copy signed. Both gone now in the twinkling of gloriously painted eyes that recall the mad decadent verse of Edmund Gosse: 

‘Prince-jewellers, whose facet-rhymes combine/ All hues that glow, all rays that shift & shine/ Farewell thy song is sung, thy splendour fled.’……….